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orchid


orchid
Photo Information
Copyright: ROBERTO INTILE (rintile) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 979 W: 66 N: 2708] (15972)
Genre: Places
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2015-01-08
Categories: Nature, Artwork, Abstract
Exposure: f/4.5, 1/100 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2015-01-08 14:23
Viewed: 736
Points: 6
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
take a phooto, cut, use fractalius filter and noiseware
Description to Wikipedia.
The generic name means "Phalaen[a]-like" and is probably a reference to the genus Phalaena, the name given by Carl Linnaeus to a group of large moths; the flowers of some species supposedly resemble moths in flight.[4] For this reason, the species are sometimes called Moth orchids.

They are native throughout southeast Asia from the Himalayan mountains to the islands of Polillo, Palawan and Zamboanga del Norte in the island of Mindanao in the Philippines and northern Australia. Orchid Island of Taiwan is named after this genus. Little recent information about their habitat and their ecology in nature is available since little field research has been done in the last decades.

Most are epiphytic shade plants; a few are lithophytes.[5] In the wild, some species grow below the canopies of moist and humid lowland forests, protected against direct sunlight; others grow in seasonally dry or cool environments. The species have adapted individually to these three habitats.

Possessing neither pseudobulbs nor rhizome, Phalaenopsis shows a monopodial growth habit: a single growing stem produces one or two alternate, thick, fleshy, elliptical leaves a year from the top while the older, basal leaves drop off at the same rate. If very healthy, a Phalaenopsis plant can have up to ten or more leaves. The inflorescence, either a raceme or panicle, appears from the stem between the leaves. They bloom in their full glory for several weeks. If kept in the home, the flowers may last two to three months.[citation needed]

Some Phalaenopsis species in Malaysia are known to use subtle weather cues to coordinate mass flowering

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Critiques [Translate]

Hi,

Its a nice attempt and the output is also so impressive and peculiar. Nice job.

Kishore

Bom dia Roberto,
Definitely you are a good specialist in fractal art.
Excellent and well presented.
Rgds.
R.

Hi Roberto

A very clean and sharp image with a complemntary background. What is a fractalius filter?

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