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rintile Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 979 W: 66 N: 2708] (15972)
The majority of ornamental roses are hybrids that were bred for their flowers. A few, mostly species roses are grown for attractive or scented foliage (such as Rosa glauca and Rosa rubiginosa), ornamental thorns (such as Rosa sericea) or for their showy fruit (such as Rosa moyesii).





Hybrid tea rose cultivar 'Mrs. Herbert Stevens'
Ornamental roses have been cultivated for millennia, with the earliest known cultivation known to date from at least 500 BC in Mediterranean countries, Persia, and China.[] Many thousands of rose hybrids and cultivars have been bred and selected for garden use as flowering plants. Most are double-flowered with many or all of the stamens having mutated into additional petals.

In the early 19th century the Empress Josephine of France patronized the development of rose breeding at her gardens at Malmaison. As long ago as 1840 a collection numbering over one thousand different cultivars, varieties and species was possible when a rosarium was planted by Loddiges nursery for Abney Park Cemetery, an early Victorian garden cemetery and arboretum in England.


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rintile Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 979 W: 66 N: 2708] (15972)
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Edited by:x-ray Silver Star Critiquer/Gold Workshop Editor [C: 38 W: 69 N: 3] (163)

adjusted levels and added a slight touch of local tone mapping in psp x6